Category : Natural History

Natural History / Natural History - 1 year ago

What is a catcher beach?

A classic example of a catcher beach along the shores of Hawaii. This map shows debris concentrations from an aerial survey done in Alaska in 2012. The map points to two known catcher areas, along Kruzof Island and Gore Point. Not to be...

Natural History / Natural History - 1 year ago

What is a King Tide?

A king tide viewed from south of Pier 96 in San Francisco, California, in February, 2016. Credit: Dave Rauenbuehler A King Tide is a non-scientific term people often use to describe exceptionally high tides. Tides are long-period waves that ro...

Natural History / Natural History - 1 year ago

What are the Roaring Forties?

A research vessel braves the strong westerly winds of the Roaring Forties during an expedition to measure levels of dissolved carbon dioxide in the surface of the ocean. During the Age of Sail (circa 15th  to 19th centuries), these strong prev...

Natural History / Natural History - 1 year ago

What is the Pineapple Express?

This animation from NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory shows an atmospheric river event in January 2017. Atmospheric rivers are relatively narrow regions in the atmosphere that are responsible for most of the horizontal transport of water va...

Natural History / Natural History - 1 year ago

Are all fish cold-blooded?

Fisheries biologist Nicholas Wegner of NOAA Fisheries' Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, California, lead author of the a 2015 research paper that discovered the unique warm-blooded characteristics of the opah (shown here). Not a...

Natural History / Natural History - 1 year ago

What is ocean noise?

Humpback whales swimming underwater. Photo credit: Ed Lyman/NOAA, under NOAA permit #14682 Many marine organisms rely on their ability to hear for their survival. Sound is the most efficient means of communication underwater and is the primary...

Natural History / Natural History - 1 year ago

What are the trade winds?

The Charles W. Morgan is the last of an American whaling fleet that once numbered more than 2,700 vessels. Ships like the Morgan often used routes defined by the trade winds to navigate the oceans. Known to sailors around the world, the trade...

Natural History / Natural History - 1 year ago

What is a sea lamprey?

The rasping mouth of the sea lamprey, an infamous Great Lakes invader. Image credit: Ted Lawrence/Great Lakes Fishery Commission Among the most primitive of all vertebrate species, the sea lamprey is a parasitic fish native to the northern and...