Tag: Basics

Natural History / Natural History - 2 years ago

What is the Forchhammer's Principle?

A CTD (conductivity, temperature, and depth) device. The primary function of this tool is to detect how the conductivity and temperature of the water column changes relative to depth. Conductivity is a measure of how well a solution conducts elec...

Natural History / Natural History - 2 years ago

What is a bight?

Can you spot the bight? This image shows the Southern California Bight—the curved coastline between Point Conception and San Diego that encompasses the Channel Islands (and NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary). A bight is a long,...

Natural History / Natural History - 3 years ago

What is a thermocline?

The red line in this illustration shows a typical seawater temperature profile. In the thermocline, temperature decreases rapidly from the mixed upper layer of the ocean (called the epipelagic zone) to much colder deep water in the thermocline (m...

Natural History / Natural History - 3 years ago

What is a wetland?

VIDEO: What is a wetland? Here's what you need to know in less than a minute. Transcript There are many different kinds of wetlands and many ways to categorize them. NOAA classifies wetlands into five general types: marine (ocean), estuarine...

Natural History / Natural History - 3 years ago

What is aquaculture?

VIDEO: What is aquaculture? Here's what you need to know in less than a minute. Transcript As the demand for seafood has increased, technology has made it possible to grow food in coastal marine waters and the open ocean. Aquaculture is a me...

Natural History / Natural History - 3 years ago

Why does the ocean have waves?

VIDEO: What are waves? Here's what you need to know in less than a minute. Transcript The ocean is never still. Whether observing from the beach or a boat, we expect to see waves on the horizon. Waves are created by energy passing through wa...

Natural History / Natural History - 4 years ago

What is PORTS®?

PORTS® facilitates safe and efficient movement through U.S. seaports, helping to ensure our nation's economic health and prosperity. Shown here: the Jacksonville PORTS®, the second largest established in the national system, includes 46 operation...

Natural History / Natural History - 4 years ago

What do geodesists do?

Geodesists measure and monitor the Earth’s size and shape, geodynamic phenomena (e.g., tides and polar motion), and gravity field to determine the exact coordinates of any point on Earth and how that point will move over time. Using a wide var...

Natural History / Natural History - 4 years ago

Are there oceans on other planets?

Europa is thought to have subsurface liquid water. Scientists hypothesize that Europa's hidden ocean is salty, tidal, and causes its ice surface to move, resulting in large fractures which are clearly visible in the above image. Although Europa i...

Natural History / Natural History - 4 years ago

What is a slough?

South Slough is a 4,771-acre National Estuarine Research Reserve located on Coos Bay Estuary in Oregon (Image credit: South Slough NERR). A slough is typically used to describe wetlands. Sloughs along the edges of rivers form where the old cha...

Natural History / Natural History - 4 years ago

Is the Earth round?

This NASA image shows Earth from space. The image is a combination of data from two satellites. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA’s Terra satellite collected the land surface data over 16 days, while...

Natural History / Natural History - 4 years ago

What is a hurricane?

VIDEO: What is a hurricane? Here's what you need to know in less than a minute. Transcript A tropical cyclone is a rotating low-pressure weather system that has organized thunderstorms but no fronts (a boundary separating two air masses of d...

Natural History / Natural History - 5 years ago

What is a seiche?

This animation shows a standing wave (black) depicted as a sum of two propagating waves traveling in opposite directions (blue and red). Similar in motion to a seesaw, a seiche is a standing wave in which the largest vertical oscillations are at e...