Tag: Ocean Observations

Natural History / Natural History - 2 years ago

What is marine biogeography?

Creating a habitat ecosystem map of the seafloor—a key component of marine biogeography—is a tricky process. Learn how it works in this two-minute video. Learn more. By mapping benthic habitats, studying what occurs on the bottom of a body...

Natural History / Natural History - 2 years ago

What is the Forchhammer's Principle?

A CTD (conductivity, temperature, and depth) device. The primary function of this tool is to detect how the conductivity and temperature of the water column changes relative to depth. Conductivity is a measure of how well a solution conducts elec...

Natural History / Natural History - 2 years ago

What is a NOAA tide table?

This image shows daily tide predictions for Eastport, Maine, for January-February 1867. This page is from the first edition of a national annual tide table publication created in 1866 by the U.S. Coast Survey, a predecessor of NOAA. A tide tab...

Natural History / Natural History - 2 years ago

What is a maritime forest?

These stumps are evidence that trees once grew here, but due to a constantly changing shoreline, they are now mostly submerged in the ocean. Maritime forests are shoreline estuaries that grow along coastal barrier islands that support a great...

Natural History / Natural History - 2 years ago

What is a High Seas Forecast?

The National Weather Service provides High Seas forecasts for large areas of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, U.S. coastal areas, and the Great Lakes. Seafaring can be very dangerous for ships at sea. For centuries, little could be done to mak...

Natural History / Natural History - 2 years ago

What is a bight?

Can you spot the bight? This image shows the Southern California Bight—the curved coastline between Point Conception and San Diego that encompasses the Channel Islands (and NOAA's Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary). A bight is a long,...

Natural History / Natural History - 3 years ago

What is a thermocline?

The red line in this illustration shows a typical seawater temperature profile. In the thermocline, temperature decreases rapidly from the mixed upper layer of the ocean (called the epipelagic zone) to much colder deep water in the thermocline (m...

Natural History / Natural History - 3 years ago

What is HAZMAT?

In January 2010, a crude oil tanker (T/V Eagle Otome) and a barge collided in Port Arthur, Texas. Oil spilled during this incident is an example of hazardous material, or HAZMAT. Under the National Contingency Plan, NOAA provides scientific suppo...

Natural History / Natural History - 3 years ago

What is an ocean glider?

Scientists are now experimenting with using gliders to locate populations of spawning fish. The glider illustrated here is outfitted with an acoustic receiver to “listen” for vocalizations—grunting sounds—made by some fish as they mass togethe...

Natural History / Natural History - 3 years ago

What is a marsh organ?

An installed marsh organ at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in the Florida Panhandle. A NOS-sponsored project in the Gulf of Mexico employs the marsh organ to mimic sea level rise impacts on marsh vegetation and inform foreca...

Natural History / Natural History - 3 years ago

What is a turbidity current?

Turbidity currents can be caused by earthquakes, collapsing slopes, and other geological disturbances. Once set in motion, the turbid water rushes downward and can change the physical shape of the seafloor. Turbidity is a measure of the level...

Natural History / Natural History - 3 years ago

Why does the ocean have waves?

VIDEO: What are waves? Here's what you need to know in less than a minute. Transcript The ocean is never still. Whether observing from the beach or a boat, we expect to see waves on the horizon. Waves are created by energy passing through wa...