Tag: Ocean Observations

Natural History / Natural History - 6 years ago

What is 'Old Sow'?

While the turbulent water of Old Sow can be dangerous to small-craft mariners, its swirling motion has a positive environmental effect. It causes nutrients and tiny sea creatures normally found in the bay’s colder, deeper waters to rise to the su...

Natural History / Natural History - 6 years ago

What is sea foam?

Sea Foam at Ocean Beach in San Francisco. If you scoop up some water from the ocean in a clear glass and look at it closely, you'll see that it's chock full of tiny particles. Seawater contains dissolved salts, proteins, fats, dead algae, dete...

Natural History / Natural History - 6 years ago

How big is the Atlantic Ocean?

As the second largest ocean basin, the Atlantic Ocean borders the east coast of the U.S., while the Pacific, Earth's largest ocean basin, borders the U.S. West Coast. Covering approximately 20 percent of the Earth’s surface, the Atlantic Ocean...

Natural History / Natural History - 6 years ago

What is the cryosphere?

Beaufort Sea, north of Alaska. One part of the cryosphere is ice that is found in water. This includes frozen parts of the ocean, such as waters surrounding Antarctica and the Arctic. There are places on Earth that are so cold that water is fr...

Natural History / Natural History - 6 years ago

What is the geoid?

A depiction of the United States geoid. Areas in yellow and orange have a slightly stronger gravity field as a result of the Rocky Mountains. While we often think of the earth as a sphere, our planet is actually very bumpy and irregular. The r...

Natural History / Natural History - 6 years ago

What is Digital Coast?

Data sets alone are not enough. For data to be truly useful, people often need assistance by way of relevant training and associated tools and information. The Digital Coast provides this complete package for the coastal management community. Pe...

Natural History / Natural History - 6 years ago

What is the Storm QuickLook?

This image is part of a Storm QuickLook generated on Aug. 25, 2011, as Hurricane Irene approached the eastern seaboard. When NOAA's National Weather Service issues a tropical storm warning for the U.S. or its territories, the Storm QuickLook i...

Natural History / Natural History - 7 years ago

Is there gold in the ocean?

If searching for gold, this ROV wouldn't find it. Gold in the ocean is so dilute that its concentration is on the order of parts per trillion. Pictured above, the ROV Deep Discoverer investigates the geomorphology of Block Canyon in the Atlantic...

Natural History / Natural History - 7 years ago

How did the Hawaiian Islands form?

The Hawaiian Emperor seamount chain is a well-known example of a large seamount and island chain created by hot-spot volcanism. Each island or submerged seamount in the chain is successively older toward the northwest. Near Hawaii, the age progre...