Tag: Tides and Currents

Natural History / Natural History - 3 years ago

What is a turbidity current?

Turbidity currents can be caused by earthquakes, collapsing slopes, and other geological disturbances. Once set in motion, the turbid water rushes downward and can change the physical shape of the seafloor. Turbidity is a measure of the level...

Natural History / Natural History - 3 years ago

Why does the ocean have waves?

VIDEO: What are waves? Here's what you need to know in less than a minute. Transcript The ocean is never still. Whether observing from the beach or a boat, we expect to see waves on the horizon. Waves are created by energy passing through wa...

Natural History / Natural History - 4 years ago

What is PORTS®?

PORTS® facilitates safe and efficient movement through U.S. seaports, helping to ensure our nation's economic health and prosperity. Shown here: the Jacksonville PORTS®, the second largest established in the national system, includes 46 operation...

Natural History / Natural History - 4 years ago

What are the horse latitudes?

The horse latitudes are regions located at about 30 degrees north and south of the equator. These latitudes are characterized by calm winds and little precipitation. The horse latitudes are located at about 30 degrees north and south of the eq...

Natural History / Natural History - 6 years ago

What is 'Old Sow'?

While the turbulent water of Old Sow can be dangerous to small-craft mariners, its swirling motion has a positive environmental effect. It causes nutrients and tiny sea creatures normally found in the bay’s colder, deeper waters to rise to the su...

Natural History / Natural History - 6 years ago

What is a perigean spring tide?

About three or four times a year (in the spring and the fall), the new or full moon coincides closely in time with the perigee of the moon—the point when the moon is closest to the Earth. These occurrences are often called 'perigean spring tides....

Natural History / Natural History - 7 years ago

Do the Great Lakes have tides?

View of the Holland, Michigan water level and meteorological station, located at the entrance to Macatawa Bay. Historic water level data has been collected in this vicinity since 1894. True tides—changes in water level caused by the gravitatio...

Natural History / Natural History - 7 years ago

How do we monitor tides?

This image shows the Chesapeake City tide station, an active water level gauge that is part of NOAA's National Water Level Observation Network, located in Chesapeake City, Md. The Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services main...

Natural History / Natural History - 8 years ago

What is an eddy?

Can you spot the eddies? This NASA image shows a field of eddies in the waters around Tasmania. The swirling motion of eddies in the ocean cause nutrients that are normally found in colder, deeper waters to come to the surface. Here, phytoplankto...