Tag: Tides and Currents

Natural History / Natural History - 8 years ago

Why is data on currents important?

The speed and direction of currents can be measured. Oceanographers use a variety of tools, including buoys, to monitor currents. With predicted, real-time, and forecasted currents, people can safely dock and undock ships, maneuver them in con...

Natural History / Natural History - 8 years ago

What is the Loop Current?

In this image from the NOAA Environmental Visualization Lab, the loop current in the center of the Gulf of Mexico is large and warm, while winter-chilled water draining the Mississippi River watershed envelop the bayous and bays of Louisiana....

Natural History / Natural History - 8 years ago

What is a tidal wave?

The rise and fall of the tides play an important role in the natural world and can have a marked effect on maritime-related activities. The image aboves shows the NOAA San Francisco Tide Station, in operation for more than 150 years. A tidal w...

Natural History / Natural History - 8 years ago

How do we measure currents?

Crew from the NOAA Ship Rainier assists in a current survey of waters near Sitka, Alaska. Results from current surveys are used to improve tidal current predictions and to support new operational forecast models. An observer stands on a ship,...

Natural History / Natural History - 8 years ago

Why do we study tides?

Tide stations are constructed to measure tides and analyze data so that scientists can predict tides and publish tide tables. Scientists measure the times, heights, and extents of both the rise and fall of the tidal waters that support a numbe...

Natural History / Natural History - 9 years ago

How frequent are tides?

The two tidal bulges caused by inertia and gravity will rotate around the Earth as the moons position changes. These bulges represent high tides while the flat sides indicate low tides. A lunar day is how long it takes for one point on the Ear...

Natural History / Natural History - 9 years ago

Who first charted the Gulf Stream?

Alexander Agassiz, a preeminent oceanographer of the 19th century, attributed the first scientific basis for exploring the Gulf Stream to American statesman Benjamin Franklin.  Franklin published this map of the Gulf Stream in 1769, 200 years bef...

Natural History / Natural History - 9 years ago

Is change important to estuaries?

Estuaries experience change many times a day due to tides. Shown here: Located at the northern end of the Ten Thousand Islands on the gulf coast of Florida, the Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve represents one of the few remaining u...

Natural History / Natural History - 9 years ago

What does an oceanographer do?

Several thousand marine scientists are busy at work in the United States dealing with a diversity of important issues — from climate change, declining fisheries, and eroding coastlines, to the development of new drugs from marine resources and th...

Natural History / Natural History - 9 years ago

What is a rip current?

We all love the beach in the summer. The sun, the sand, and the surf. But just because we're having fun, doesn't mean we can forget about safety. Get the facts about rip currents in this Ocean Today video. Rip currents are powerful, narrow...

Natural History / Natural History - 9 years ago

What is upwelling?

This graphic shows how displaced surface waters are replaced by cold, nutrient-rich water that “wells up” from below. Winds blowing across the ocean surface push water away. Water then rises up from beneath the surface to replace the water tha...

Natural History / Natural History - 9 years ago

What is a tsunami?

On Nov. 18, 1929, a magnitude 7.4 Mw earthquake occurred 155 miles south of Newfoundland along the southern edge of the Grand Banks, Canada. This illustration, called a Tsunami Time Travel Map, shows the arrival times of tsunami waves. Red: 1-4 h...

Natural History / Natural History - 9 years ago

What is a current?

You know about ocean tides, but how much do you know about ocean currents? Watch our three-minute video podcast to learn what puts the motion in the ocean. Ocean currents are driven by wind, water density differences, and tides. Oceanic cur...

Natural History / Natural History - 9 years ago

How fast is the Gulf Stream?

The Gulf Stream Current—the main conveyor of heat from south to north in the Atlantic—swirls surface waters in this infrared image from the Suomi NPP satellite on April 16, 2013, centered around 180 miles due east of Atlantic City, NJ. The Gul...